Undergraduate Students

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Elsa Brais-Dussault

I am beginning my last year as an undergraduate student at the Université du Québec à Montréal. I decided to study in the Psychology program to learn and to understand more about the human individual, but also to understand how members of social groups interact with their environment. I am really interested in the social and cultural aspects of human behavior. My implication in the LRSI has begun by helping out Maya Yampolsky with her doctoral research. Afterwards, I participated in the development of the CIEL study (2011-2012), a longitudinal study conducted among international students in Montreal. My tasks involved recruiting the participants, updating the blog (www.CIELMontreal.com), cleaning-up the database, and communicating with the participants during the study. In the next years, I plan to improve my skills in the field of social and cultural psychology, by conducting research on intercultural communication and the cultural differences between social relationships that emerge in social groups. I am very interested in the influence of culture in the development of different lifestyles and interpersonal relationships. I developed these interests when taking the social psychology class and throughout my implication in the CIEL study. This study allows me to improve my skills and knowledge of how international students integrate a new culture, and how they develop new social identities and memberships in multiple social groups.

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Valérie Chevalier

I am currently an undergraduate student in psychology at Université du Québec à Montréal. What thrills me about psychology is to understand how social and individual processes affect our well-being and our psychological adjustment. In 2012, I have joined the Research Laboratory on Self and Identity as a research assistant in order to further develop my academic knowledge. Being involved in the RLSI allows me to get more familiar with the field of scientific research regarding social psychology. I first helped out with the recruitment for the CIEL Montreal study, which investigates how international students gain a new cultural identity over time.  Presently, I am working on a research project about human’s perceptions of non-humans groups like animals. In general terms, I am interested in how people adapt their identity when they face particular situations such as migration. I am also interested in how social factors affect people’s adaptation to the environment as well as their intrapersonal processes like the self. I wish to investigate further those general themes and to bridge the gap between experimental research and clinical applications by pursuing graduate studies in psychology.

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Camille Giroux-Benoit

I am an undergraduate psychology student at the Université de Montréal, where I am currently starting my third year. I chose to study psychology because I am curious to understand how human beings think and why they act the way they do. I started my involvement in the LRSI during my freshman year by helping doctoral students Sophie Sansfaçon and Maya Yampolsky. When the opportunity to be involved in the CIEL Montreal study presented itself, I jumped on the occasion. Indeed, I am particularly interested in notions of immigration, cultural differences and identities. Other research topics that interest me include the psychology of health, adolescence and self-esteem, social psychology, and intercultural psychology. Next year I plan to continue my studies in clinical and experimental psychology at the graduate level.

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Maude Roberge

I am currently an undergraduate student in Psychology at the Université du Québec à Montréal, where I developed my interest for research in the URAMAS lab, directed by Dr Thérèse Bouffard, at the Department of Psychology. I am now involved in the Laboratory for Research on Self and Identity since October 2011. Up to now, I have contributed to the development of new studies that aim to better understand a type of intergroup process that has not been looked at much up to now, namely, the relations that operate between human and non human animals. It is possible to apply social psychological principles to these relations? How do our perceptions of animals influcne our behaviours toward them and even toward some groups of humans? These are the questions that interest me. In the current context, where environmental issues are salient, the topic of human-animal relations is relevant and intriguing!